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Old 6th August 2014, 05:53 AM
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Is it possible that PJ64 is going to support UHD monitors with 4K resolutions?

http://www.samsung.com/levant/consum.../LU28D590DS/ZN

like this one for example

the graphics would be a lot better in 3840 x 2160 resolution i think.

Last edited by emuguy17; 6th September 2014 at 10:05 PM.
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  #2  
Old 12th August 2014, 03:45 PM
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???
10chars
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Old 24th August 2014, 02:57 AM
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I think PJ64 will support whatever resolution the graphics hardware has. Whether or not it crashes at 3840 x 2160 is another question. All I know is it'd be stretching textures and polygons to a unprecedented level
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Old 24th August 2014, 04:43 PM
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A console that supports 256 x 244, 320 x 240 and 640 x 480 resolutions I imagine would suffer quite a bit at super high resolutions.
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Old 26th August 2014, 12:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the_randomizer View Post
A console that supports 256 x 244, 320 x 240 and 640 x 480 resolutions I imagine would suffer quite a bit at super high resolutions.

The N64 has a Z-Buffer...so it can scale polygons without suffering from texture/polygon popping. It can do any resolution you wish if you use a Glide Wrapper that allows you to use the desktop's resolution as an override to the Glide plugin's full screen resolution settings.
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Old 26th August 2014, 05:04 PM
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Z-buffering pertains only to camera zooming within a fixed viewport such a 256x224, 320x240 or 640x480.
It doesn't mean that the N64 "can do any resolution you wish". In fact it can never go above 640x240 without interlacing.

Glide64 is just simply another HLE plugin that has little accurate emulation of the VI. You think high-resolution is correct because it looks good to you; that's all. Now stop spreading faggotry.
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Old 26th August 2014, 08:53 PM
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Two things...HQ4X,and highest resolution selectable.

I get an amazing quality on my Fire TV (Android) with the emulator's resolution set natively to 1080P on my Polaroid 1920x1080 LED TV,and even better with HQ4X enabled.
Too bad most other plugins lack the HQ4X enhancement.

*derp*If someone can,try adding this kind of feature of HQ4X to Glide64 along with tweaks to prevent the performance from majorly dropping.
*possible oh,wait moment*

I think it already has HQ4X!
Still would be nice to have a heavily tweaked version for higher performance.
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Old 26th August 2014, 10:12 PM
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There is no 1080p resolution on the N64. It only goes up to 240p.

It only looks 1080p to you because Glide64 doesn't emulate frame buffer read from RDRAM to a VI pre-scale for DAC to the television. It just shoves plain geometry on the screen without accurate VI emulation for the sake of hi-res look.

No doubt that you may prefer it this way, but if it's not related to accurate emulation, then why make every single post of yours on this forum about adding what's really a hack? I think we should be focusing on accuracy first hacks last. I don't agree that HLE is a hack necessarily, but I think that the shit in this thread is.
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Old 27th August 2014, 02:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HatCat View Post
There is no 1080p resolution on the N64. It only goes up to 240p.

It only looks 1080p to you because Glide64 doesn't emulate frame buffer read from RDRAM to a VI pre-scale for DAC to the television. It just shoves plain geometry on the screen without accurate VI emulation for the sake of hi-res look.

No doubt that you may prefer it this way, but if it's not related to accurate emulation, then why make every single post of yours on this forum about adding what's really a hack? I think we should be focusing on accuracy first hacks last. I don't agree that HLE is a hack necessarily, but I think that the shit in this thread is.
It may do that...but one must not forget that I also emulate PS1 games...and I also own an SPCH 7502 PS1....The hardware is incapable of z-buffer clamping polygons. The N64 is. That makes it easier to expand the size of polygons while causing less jagged lines. If you ever get a chance to look at the development engines for the n64, GameCube, and Wii..you will see that the 3d modeling hasn't changed much in scaling and sizing. We also have to remember that the native output resolution to the TV is 240p...Oh sure it causes jaggies, but because of the z-clamping capability, textures stay on the polygons as all N64 games were designed that way.

Total Frame Buffer emulation with Glide64 can be achieved by checking the box "Read Every Frame" in the emulation settings tab of its configuration file. It is particularly more accurate for use in MarioKart 64's Luigi's Raceway...the real N64 version of the game displayed the Jumbotron above the tunnel entrance in jerky movements rather than Jabos d3d Plugin's smoothe video frame rate in the same space.

I merely focus accuracy of the timing and how it looked frame rate-wise on the actual machine. The reason the N64 had such good frame rates is because the hardware couldn't handle resolutions above 240p without the RAM expansion in place. Anything more would have forced the machine to scale the polygons...which would slow it down. This is why 1080p mode for WiiU VC n64 games looks better on modern machinery than their original counterparts...This is because the modern machines can handle the task of actively scaling the polygons to 1080p. That may also be why hacks might be necessary to achieve certain geometries already programmed into the game that allow it to expand without much of an issue concerning texture popping.
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Last edited by Wally123; 27th August 2014 at 02:44 PM.
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Old 27th August 2014, 02:39 PM
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Quote:
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I merely focus accuracy of timing.
Wut
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are you american or something
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